Posts Tagged ‘production’

Pfam SARS-CoV-2 special update

April 2, 2020

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has mobilised a worldwide research effort to understand the pathogen itself and the mechanism of COVID-19 disease, as well as to identify treatment options. Although Pfam already provided useful annotation for SARS-CoV-2, we decided to update our models and annotations for this virus in an effort to help the research community. This post explains what was done and how we are making the data available as quickly as possible.

What have we done?

We assessed all the protein sequences provided by UniProt via its new COVID-19 portal (https://covid-19.uniprot.org/), identified those which lacked an existing Pfam model, and set about building models as required. In some cases we built families based on recently solved structures of SARS-CoV-2 proteins. For example, we built three new families representing the three structural domains of the NSP15 protein (Figure 1) based on the structure by Youngchang Kim and colleagues (http://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR115432). In other cases, such as Pfam’s RNA dependent RNA polymerase family (PF00680), we took our existing family and extended its taxonomic range to ensure it included the new SARS-CoV-2 sequences.

Figure 1. The structure of NSP15 (PDB:6VWW) from Kim et al. shows the three new Pfam domains. (1) CoV_NSP15_N (PF19219) Coronavirus replicase NSP15, N-terminal oligomerisation domain in red, (2) CoV_NSP15_M (PF19216) Coronavirus replicase NSP15, middle domain in blue and (3) CoV_NSP15_C (PF19215) Coronavirus replicase NSP15, uridylate-specific endoribonuclease in green.

We have also stratified our ID nomenclature and descriptions of the families to ensure they are both correct and consistent. The majority of the family identifiers now begin with either CoV, for coronavirus specific families, or bCoV for the families which are specific to the betacoronavirus clade, which SARS-CoV-2 belongs to. We have also fixed inconsistencies in the naming and descriptions of the various non-structural proteins, using NSPx for those proteins encoded by the replicase polyprotein, and NSx for those encoded by other ORFs. We are grateful to Philippe Le Mercier from the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics who gave us valuable guidance for our nomenclature.

Where are the data?

You can access a small HMM library (Pfam-A.SARS-CoV-2.hmm) for all the Pfam families that match the SARS-CoV-2 protein sequences on the Pfam FTP site:

ftp://ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/Pfam/releases/Pfam_SARS-CoV-2_1.0/

You can also find a file (matches.scan) showing the matches of the models against the SARS-CoV-2 sequences in the same FTP location. These updates are not yet available on the Pfam website. We anticipate making them available in 6-8 weeks.  We hope you find our SARS-CoV-2 models useful for your research, and as always we welcome your feedback via email at pfam-help@ebi.ac.uk.

How to use this library?

This library is not compatible with the pfam_scan software that we normally recommend to reproduce Pfam matches, as this library only contains a small subset of models.  If you wish to compare these models to your own sequences, please use the following HMMER commands:

$ hmmpress  Pfam-A.SARS-CoV-2.hmm

This only needs to be performed once. Then to compare your sequences (in a file called my.fasta) to this special Pfam profile HMM library, then:

$ hmmscan --cut_ga --domtblout matches.scan Pfam-A.SARS-CoV-2.hmm my.fasta

The –domtblout option enables you to save the matches in a more convenient tabular form, if you do not want to parse the HMMER output.

And finally

We will be making Pfam alignments available during the next week and will produce another blog post describing them.

Posted by The Pfam team

Pfam 31.0 is released

March 8, 2017

Pfam 31.0 contains a total of 16712 families and 604 clans. Since the last release, we have built 415 new families, killed 9 families and created 11 new clans.  We have also been working on expanding our clan classification; in Pfam 31.0, over 36% of Pfam entries are placed within a clan. Read the rest of this entry »

Pfam 30.0 is available

July 1, 2016

Pfam 30.0, our second release based on UniProt reference proteomes, is now available. The new release contains a total of 16,306 families, with 22 new families and 11 families killed since the last release. The UniProt reference proteome set has expanded and now includes 17.7 million sequences, compared with 11.9 million when we made Pfam 29.0. In this release, we have updated the annotations on hundreds of Pfam entries, and renamed some of our Domains of Unknown Function (DUF) families.

DUFs are protein domains whose function is uncharacterised. Over time, as scientific knowledge increases and new data about proteins comes to light, more information about the function of a domain may become available. As a result, DUFs can be renamed and re-annotated with more meaningful descriptions. As part of Pfam 30.0, we have re-annotated 116 DUFs based on updated information in the UniProtKB database, the scientific literature, and feedback from Pfam and InterPro users. Examples of some our DUF updates in Pfam 30.0 are given below:

 

  • PF10265, created in release 23.0 and originally named DUF2217, has been renamed to Miga, a family of proteins that promote mitochondrial fusion.
  • PF10229, created in release 23.0 and originally named DUF2246, has been renamed as MMADHC, as it represents methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D proteins and their homologues.  The structure of this domain is shown below.

 

5cv0

Structure of MMADHC dimer, PDB:5CV0

 

  • PF12822, created in release 25.0 and originally named DUF3816, has been renamed to ECF_trnsprt, since it contains proteins identified as the substrate-specific component of energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters.

Please note that we may change the identifier for a family (e.g. DUF2217), but we never change the accession for a family (e.g. PF10265).

If you find any more DUFs that can be assigned a name based on function, or any other annotation updates, please get in touch with us (pfam-help@ebi.ac.uk).

 

TreeFam 9 is now available!

May 3, 2013

We are happy to announce that TreeFam 9 is online and you can find it under http://www.treefam.org.

TreeFam 9 now has 109 species (vs. 79 in TreeFam 8) and is based on data from Ensembl v69, Ensembl Genomes v16, Wormbase and JGI.

This release marks an important step for TreeFam as it is the first release build since TreeFam has been resurrected.
Here is a list of the most important changes in TreeFam 9:

  • New website layout (adopting the Pfam/Rfam/Dfam layout)
  • Infrastructure move of web servers and databases to the EBI
  • Sequence search against the library of TreeFam family profiles
  • new tree visualisations in pure javascript using D3, e.g. see the BRCA2 gene tree here.
  • Pairwise homology download

We hope you find all the information you are looking for. If you don’t, please let us know so that we can include the information you want. The old website will remain online here.

If you have questions, suggestions or find bugs, don’t hesitate to contact us through our new forum here.

Happy treefamming,

the TreeFam team
(Fabian, Mateus)

Pfam 27.0 is now available!

March 22, 2013

In a blog post published just over a year ago, I proposed a number of changes to the content of Pfam to improve scalability and usability of the database.  These changes came into effect a few days ago, when we released Pfam 27.0.  This release of Pfam contains a total of 14831 families, with 1182 new families and 22 families killed since release 26.0. 80% of all proteins in UniProt contain a match to at least one Pfam domain, and 58% of all residues in the sequence database fall within a Pfam domain. Read the rest of this entry »

Does my family of interest have a determined 3D protein structure?

May 9, 2012

Two related questions that we are often asked via the Pfam helpdesk is ‘Which families have a known three-dimensional structure?’ and ‘Why is a particular a PDB structure not found in Pfam’.  You may think that there are obvious answers to these questions – but as with many things in life the answer is not necessarily as straight forward as you would have thought. In this joint posting between Andreas Prlic (senior scientist at RCSB Protein Data Bank) and myself (Rob Finn, Pfam Production Lead), we will elaborate on the way the PDB and Pfam cross referencing occurs, why discrepancies occurred in the past and describe the pipeline that the RCSB PDB has implemented using the HMMER web services API, which should provide the most current answer to these  questions. Read the rest of this entry »

Proposed Pfam release changes

February 27, 2012

The current Pfam release, version 26.0, took approximately 4 months to nurse through the various stages of updating the sequence database, resolving overlaps between families, rebuilding the MySQL database and performing all of the post-processing that constitutes the ‘release’.  The production team strives to make two releases a year, but I really do not fancy spend two thirds of a year on Pfam releases.  Thus, with my colleagues, I have been reviewing what we do and why we do it and, probably more importantly, assessing how much different sections of the Web site are used.  Below is a list of changes that are going to happen in the next release, release 27.0.

Read the rest of this entry »