Archive for the 'TreeFam' Category

Moving to xfam.org

May 1, 2014

Back in November 2012 we announced that the Xfam team in the UK was moving from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute to the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), just next door on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus. On Tuesday we completed that move by switching off the Pfam and Rfam websites inside Sanger and redirecting all traffic to our shiny new home at xfam.org. You can now find the Pfam and Rfam websites at pfam.xfam.org and rfam.xfam.org respectively. Read the rest of this entry »

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Visualising & exploring TreeFam gene families

February 19, 2014

The latest TreeFam release 9 has 15,736 gene families. These families vary significantly in size (number of family members), conservation (alignment conservation) and taxonomic diversity (younger families that are only found in e.g. Vertebrates vs. older ones that were present in the last common ancestor of Metazoa).

Visualising & exploring gene families

We have always wanted to find a way to visualise our families according to the above mentioned criteria.
Wouldn’t it be nice if you could easily see all highly conserved families or all families with >= 400 genes? Read the rest of this entry »

We’ve moved, now the websites

January 30, 2014

In November 2012, we announced that the Xfam groups were moving the few tens of metres from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute to the European Bioinformatics Institute. We warned you then, that the websites would also eventually move. Read the rest of this entry »

TreeFam: new Orthology-on-the-fly feature

September 17, 2013

The identification of orthologs in related organism is a routine task and many databases/tools are available to do that. Some of the databases can be installed locally, which is not ideal in cases where the target is to find orthologs for a single/few genes only. To fill this gap, we developed a quick orthology-on-the-fly prediction tool that is built on top of the HMMER search we introduced in release 9 and can be used here: www.treefam.org. Read the rest of this entry »

TreeFam 9 is now available!

May 3, 2013

We are happy to announce that TreeFam 9 is online and you can find it under http://www.treefam.org.

TreeFam 9 now has 109 species (vs. 79 in TreeFam 8) and is based on data from Ensembl v69, Ensembl Genomes v16, Wormbase and JGI.

This release marks an important step for TreeFam as it is the first release build since TreeFam has been resurrected.
Here is a list of the most important changes in TreeFam 9:

  • New website layout (adopting the Pfam/Rfam/Dfam layout)
  • Infrastructure move of web servers and databases to the EBI
  • Sequence search against the library of TreeFam family profiles
  • new tree visualisations in pure javascript using D3, e.g. see the BRCA2 gene tree here.
  • Pairwise homology download

We hope you find all the information you are looking for. If you don’t, please let us know so that we can include the information you want. The old website will remain online here.

If you have questions, suggestions or find bugs, don’t hesitate to contact us through our new forum here.

Happy treefamming,

the TreeFam team
(Fabian, Mateus)

TreeFam: What’s in the next release

December 10, 2012

Behind the scenes we are working hard on building the next TreeFam release, which will be TreeFam 9.

TreeFam 9 will have 109 species, that is a 37% increase over TreeFam 8. Most of the species come from EnsEMBL (v.69) and EnsEMBL genomes (v.16) with a few ones coming from JGI.

Besides that – and probably most important for the user – will be our new web site. Based on the success of other Xfam-databases like Pfam [5], Rfam [6] and -most recently- Dfam [7], we decided to give the TreeFam website a face lift by adapting it to the Xfam look&feel.

So, there are great things to come and soon we will have our next blog post.
The next TreeFam blog post will then be about TreeFam 9!

TreeFam is back with a new release !

March 27, 2012

As some of you will already be aware, the Xfam family has recently gained a new member: the TreeFam database.
TreeFam aims to provide phylogenetic trees and orthology predictions for all animal genes.

Read the rest of this entry »