Archive for the 'Releases' Category

Rfam 12.3 is out

June 29, 2017

rfam_12_3_cover_720

The new Rfam release (version 12.3) features 101 new families, unified search, and updated documentation.

New families

Rfam 12.3 featured families

In this release 101 new families were added to the database, including over a dozen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis RNA thermometers from a recent PNAS paper by Righetti et al. We would like to thank Zasha Weinberg for contributing NiCo riboswitch, Type-P5 Twister, and several RAGATH RNAs (for example, RAGATH-5). You can browse the new families here.

Unified text search

Rfam text search

Over the years Rfam developed many specialised ways of searching and exploring the data, such as Keyword search, Taxonomy search, browsing entries by type, and “Jump To” navigation. While these options work well, they may be confusing for new users, so we set out to unify all search functionality in a single text search.

The new search is available on the Rfam homepage or at the top of any Rfam page and is powered by EBI search. It allows to browse RNA families, clans, motifs, or explore Rfam by category using facets. For example, one can view families with 3D structures or view all snoRNA families that match human sequences, and the URLs can be bookmarked or shared.

The new search is a full replacement for the old search functionality except for taxonomy, because the new search can find species but not higher-level taxa. For example, one can search for Homo sapiens but not for Mammals. Stay tuned for future updates and use the old Taxonomy search in the meantime. We plan to retire all old search functionality once the new search is fully developed but until then the old and the new searches will coexist.

For more information about the new search, see Rfam documentation. If you have any feedback, please let us know in the comments below, on GitHub, by email, or on Twitter.

New home for Rfam documentation

Rfam help has been migrated to a dedicated documentation hosting platform ReadTheDocs and is now available at http://rfam.readthedocs.org.

Rfam ReadTheDocs help

The new system offers several advantages:

The source code of the documentation is available on GitHub so if you notice a problem you can let us know by creating an issue or help us fix it by editing the text on GitHub and sending a pull request.

Other updates

  • Clan competition for PDB entries: Now the 3D structure tab, the public MySQL database, and the FTP archive show only the lowest E-value match when several RNA families from the same clan match a PDB chain. For example, chain 0 of PDB structure 1S72 (LSU rRNA from an Archaeon Haloarcula marismortui) now matches only the Archaeal LSU family instead of all families from rRNA LSU clan.
  • New 5S rRNA clan CL00113 that includes 5S rRNA and mtPerm-5S families.

What’s next

This release will be the last “point release” for Rfam 12. In the next few months we will release Rfam 13.0 which will be based on a new sequence database. Previously, Rfam annotated WGS and STD subsets of ENA, which grow very quickly and include many redundant sequences. We will take advantage of reference genomes from UniProt reference proteome collection which is a regularly updated, reduced-redundancy set of reference genomes. This allows us to perform meaningful taxonomic comparisons and explore RNA families by taxonomy without sifting through thousands of versions of the same genome.

Get in touch

As always, we welcome comments and feedback about Rfam, so feel free to get in touch by email or by submitting a new GitHub issue.

Introducing Dfam_consensus – Dfam’s consensus sequence twin

May 18, 2017

Since its inception in 2012, Dfam has demonstrated the promise of using profile hidden Markov Models (HMMs) to improve the detection sensitivity and annotation quality of Transposable Element (TEs) families in human[1] and subsequently for four additional reference organisms[2].  Despite these advances, the tools used to discover new families ( de-novo repeat finders ), improve families ( extend, defragment, subfamily clustering ), and classify TE families continue to depend on consensus sequence models.  This discordance between methodologies is a direct impediment to Dfam’s expansion.

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Pfam 31.0 is released

March 8, 2017

Pfam 31.0 contains a total of 16712 families and 604 clans. Since the last release, we have built 415 new families, killed 9 families and created 11 new clans.  We have also been working on expanding our clan classification; in Pfam 31.0, over 36% of Pfam entries are placed within a clan. Read the rest of this entry »

Pfam 30.0 is available

July 1, 2016

Pfam 30.0, our second release based on UniProt reference proteomes, is now available. The new release contains a total of 16,306 families, with 22 new families and 11 families killed since the last release. The UniProt reference proteome set has expanded and now includes 17.7 million sequences, compared with 11.9 million when we made Pfam 29.0. In this release, we have updated the annotations on hundreds of Pfam entries, and renamed some of our Domains of Unknown Function (DUF) families.

DUFs are protein domains whose function is uncharacterised. Over time, as scientific knowledge increases and new data about proteins comes to light, more information about the function of a domain may become available. As a result, DUFs can be renamed and re-annotated with more meaningful descriptions. As part of Pfam 30.0, we have re-annotated 116 DUFs based on updated information in the UniProtKB database, the scientific literature, and feedback from Pfam and InterPro users. Examples of some our DUF updates in Pfam 30.0 are given below:

 

  • PF10265, created in release 23.0 and originally named DUF2217, has been renamed to Miga, a family of proteins that promote mitochondrial fusion.
  • PF10229, created in release 23.0 and originally named DUF2246, has been renamed as MMADHC, as it represents methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D proteins and their homologues.  The structure of this domain is shown below.

 

5cv0

Structure of MMADHC dimer, PDB:5CV0

 

  • PF12822, created in release 25.0 and originally named DUF3816, has been renamed to ECF_trnsprt, since it contains proteins identified as the substrate-specific component of energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters.

Please note that we may change the identifier for a family (e.g. DUF2217), but we never change the accession for a family (e.g. PF10265).

If you find any more DUFs that can be assigned a name based on function, or any other annotation updates, please get in touch with us (pfam-help@ebi.ac.uk).

 

Pfam 29.0 is now available

December 22, 2015

Pfam 29.0, our second release of 2015, contains 16295 entries and 559 clans. We have made some major changes to our underlying sequence database and the data that are displayed on the website, which we’ve outlined below. Full details can be found in our Nucleic Acids Research paper, which is available here. Read the rest of this entry »

Meet Dfam2.0

October 30, 2015

Dfam is growing up. This is the first major expansion of the database since it’s inception. We’ve added repeat families from four new organisms: mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly, and nematode. In total, this release includes 2,844 new familes ( 4,150 total ).

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Say hello to Dfam1.4

May 13, 2015

With Dfam, we are striving to build models of repeat families that yield high sensitivity without undue false annotation.  In this release of Dfam, we have improved our model building strategy to reduce the potential for false annotation, especially in the context of overextending alignments around true interspersed repeat instances.

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Dfam 1.3 released

January 7, 2015

We are pleased to announce the release of Dfam 1.3. This release includes almost 200 new repeat families and updates the underlying human genome to hg38.

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Dfam 1.2 released

May 31, 2013

We are pleased to announce that we’ve released Dfam 1.2. This version represents a few important changes from 1.1, including increased sensitivity for many families, a new plot on the model page, and an improved Relationships tab.

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TreeFam 9 is now available!

May 3, 2013

We are happy to announce that TreeFam 9 is online and you can find it under http://www.treefam.org.

TreeFam 9 now has 109 species (vs. 79 in TreeFam 8) and is based on data from Ensembl v69, Ensembl Genomes v16, Wormbase and JGI.

This release marks an important step for TreeFam as it is the first release build since TreeFam has been resurrected.
Here is a list of the most important changes in TreeFam 9:

  • New website layout (adopting the Pfam/Rfam/Dfam layout)
  • Infrastructure move of web servers and databases to the EBI
  • Sequence search against the library of TreeFam family profiles
  • new tree visualisations in pure javascript using D3, e.g. see the BRCA2 gene tree here.
  • Pairwise homology download

We hope you find all the information you are looking for. If you don’t, please let us know so that we can include the information you want. The old website will remain online here.

If you have questions, suggestions or find bugs, don’t hesitate to contact us through our new forum here.

Happy treefamming,

the TreeFam team
(Fabian, Mateus)